From the daily archives: "Sunday, April 14, 2013"

 

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Scarlet Johansson plays a number of on-screen roles, but her real passion is dermatology. When the actress isn’t dazzling audiences, she’s reading up on the epidermis. Last month Johansson told ELLE her findings. “Lemon juice,” she says, “is great for lightening [skin]. It can be a bit stinging, so you can dilute with water.” Johansson also recommends apple cider vinegar for healing blemishes, though cautions against its pungent odor. The natural and organic movement has more celebrity clout behind it. Model Cindy Crawford prescribes a mixture of whole milk and water for skin hydration. Teri Hatcher, meanwhile, enjoys a glass of wine…in her bathtub. The desperate housewife pours vino in to her spa water to soften and exfoliate skin. Strange regimes for sure, but since they’ve made their money from looking good, we are not here to argue. Instead, these resourceful girls inspire us to think of the best ways to improve your hair care with natural remedies. And we found the kitchen cupboard to be your golden egg.  For some unexpected daily hair care tips, click style notes. Click for StyleNotes →

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Haircare is evolving. As evidenced at recent product launches, many hair care companies are applying skin science from roots to ends. Taking inspiration from skincare routines, brands are infusing products with anti-aging ingredients and moisture-binding properties. Better applicators are being used so consumers can control application more effectively; and skincare’s vocabulary is now being applied to the hair care category. When picking products, the trick is to know what ingredients to look for. For an at a glance glossary, click style notes.