From the daily archives: "Tuesday, August 6, 2013"

sGUEFtPlVyWx

This is a good one from Minka the minx. Normally we associate the off-the-face appeal of the pony with sleek and polished looks. But the modern trend for undone, tousled styles has opened the door to wear your pony with more of a rolled-out-bed ruffle. Here, a sleek top combines with a thick and lush, textured pony, which lets her peachy glow take center-stage. This chic and fashionable shape is quick and easy to create; to learn how, click style notes.

Click for StyleNotes →

carrie bradshaw

A rainy Saturday inspires me to be Carrie’d away watching reruns of Sex and the City. The show’s protagonist, Carrie Bradshaw, is known for desirable things: Mr. Big, the Fendi Baguette bag, a closet full of Jimmy Choo’s. But for me it’s her beautifully textured hair that gives Carrie her signature look. While re-watching the show, I was struck by the sexy, voluminous waves she rocked whenever she was feeling powerful and put together. Yet they are easy to create if you know how, which gave me the idea of taking her look from Reel to Real. For confidence-building and glamor waves like Carrie, click through to style notes for tips and tricks. –– Michelle Rotbart 

Click for StyleNotes →

Image 8-4-13 at 2.41 PM (1)

There’s some debate over why this cut is called the “pageboy.” Some credit the name to the similarity of the shape to styles worn by English squires, while others claim it is a reference to pinup model, Betty Page. Whatever the truth, the style shows a combination of influences, and looks sultry and youthful, feminine and tomboyish. In the 1950s, the term referred to short, beveled bobs with heavy bangs, but over time the “pageboy” changed. By the 1970s the cut had evolved into an elongated bowl shape with an unbroken edge. Today’s version uses elements from each of these looks and has a thick fringe and a short, slightly rounded outline. Read on for steps to achieving a sophisticated update of this iconic style. –– Laura Martin

Click for StyleNotes →

Image 8-4-13 at 2.41 PM

This image comes from the recent ARROJO collection, Juxtaposition. The combination of a broken edge and a classic shape creates a look that is both timeless and modern. The fluid lines and textured ends are accentuated with a soft, rosy hue. A subtle red with hints of pink and copper, this dusty tone is both feminine and grungy, perfect for playing up the dichotomies of the cut. Get formulation and application tips for the bespoke tone in the style notes. –– Laura Martin

Click for StyleNotes →