From the daily archives: "Wednesday, September 23, 2015"

rag1

Rag & Bone is all about transitional style and not just from season to season. The clothing always has the nuances of a perfect barre to brunch ensemble—the kinds of clothes you really can wear anywhere and look cool. The hair also took on this simple message, and according to the beauty team the look was all about attitude. And although it took an arsenal of styling products to create this style backstage, all you really need is a little bit of dry shampoo, a hair tie and your fingers. To see more post-workout hair inspiration from Rag & Bone, click through to style notes. –Michelle Rotbart 

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simple

Simple hairstyles are all the rage and this is the perfect time to be wearing them. We have been seeing a trend towards natural texture and lived in looks, over the past few months and it’s probably the best trend for hair in years. Click the notes for why simple styles are so in. –Kelly Rowe

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Like most stylists, I love fashion week. I look forward to seeing the new collections and the inspiring hairstyles that complement them. There are a few stylists that I always follow particularly closely: Guido Palau, Julien d’Ys, and my favorite Odile Gilbert. Gilbert is self-trained and her work always falls outside of the boundaries of classical styling. She seems to design with her own set of rules, creating looks that are highly creative but unfussy. At Rodarte’s spring/summer show she adorned soft waves with a pair of metallic clips, placing the ornaments unexpectedly—one over the part, the other just above the brow. Each model had a unique arrangement, creating a playful, childlike sensibility. At Suno, she combined a fat french braid, thick black headband, and stringy side ponytail for a look that feels like what Alice might wear to workout in Wonderland. Click the style notes to see pictures of tother inspiring styles by the incomparable Gilbert. –Laura Martin 

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Image 9-20-15 at 1.26 PM (1)

Bleached and distressed denim originated in the punk movement, but by the nineties, everyone seemed to have stone-washed jeans. The look is created by literally washing heavy material with pumice or other stones to soften the fabric and fade the hue. The method creates a mottled effect that is mostly very pale but with small bits of deeper color along the seams and flecked through the near-white fabric. Translating this look to hair gives an icy blonde base with dishwater roots and a fine smatter of lowlights. Get the formulas and application tips in the style notes. –Laura Martin 

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