From the daily archives: "Thursday, November 5, 2015"

messy bun

Somewhere in the 1980s, between scrunchies and aerobics, the messy bun was born. And since its inception the style has progressed from a late-night study session look to an essential part of it-girl style. It continues to be a go-to for post-gym and a staple on the red carpet. Earlier this week Gigi Hadid and Martha Hunt were both spotted rocking knots, perfectly showcasing model-off-duty style, while Amber Heard and Zendaya rocked textured buns for the Hollywood Film Awards in Beverly Hills. These ladies, all wearing cool variations prove the messy bun is here to stay. To see examples of what a perfectly-imperfect coil can do for your look, click through to style notes. ,–– Michelle Rotbart

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At the hairdresser's.

There are a few things every hairdresser wishes you wouldn’t do. Of course you are probably thinking showing up late is our number one and while this is probably our biggest pet peeve it’s not on the list. It’s just too obvious. Click the notes to get the 6 major things we wish you wouldn’t do so you can have better hair. –– Kelly Rowe

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menshair

Last week I attended the Deep Roots Festival, the biggest event of the year in the small southern town where I go to graduate school. The headliner this year was a JR JR, an atmospheric, electronic duo with seriously inspiring hair. Daniel Zott keeps his hair in a modified curly mohawk that’s reminiscent of European soccer stars while Joshua Epstein wears his bouncy curls in a high side ponytail. The ponytail is the perfect accessory for their buoyant, intelligent sound. It moves and shakes like a rock and roll pompom. I’d like to see this pony replace the man bun and the topknot as a new, gender-defying trend. Learn to create it on the notes. –Laura Martin 

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carrot

Carrot-top is not usually a compliment. The flat vivid orange associated with the vegetable is not a desirable shade for your strands. But this darker, blacked hue, reminiscent of the caramelized sugars produced by slow roasting, is something else entirely. This color has a copper heart, but it’s glazed with charcoal and burgundy for a complex, luxuriant tone. Get the formula and tips on application in the style notes. –– Laura Martin

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