Currently viewing the tag: "color melt"

rainbow color

Maybe we’re all loving rainbows in support of the recent supreme court decision on gay marriage. Maybe we’re inspired by all the beautiful produce that’s in season, or summer sunsets, or fireworks. Whatever the reason it seems that rainbow hair is making a comeback. We’re seeing lots of variations: entire heads covered in layers of vibrant color and muted spectrums painted through ends. Part of me loves seeing these playful looks and part of me longs for the days of more subtle palettes. What do you think? Are you loving or hating the rainbow trend? Click the style notes for more examples. –– Laura Martin

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mermaid

Are you inspired by the “mermaid hair” trend? This look normally involved shades of blue, purple, and green intertwined in color melts throughout your hair to give an ethereal mermaid of the sea feeling. The truth is that this isn’t practical for most people’s everyday life. Not many people are in job that would be okay with their employees walking around with this fantasy-inspired hair. So how can you adopt the look so it works for the more average life? Click the notes. –– Kelly Rowe

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pastels

I’ve stated many times that I don’t think pastels are just for spring and summer. Pastels are great because by shifting the tone a little bit you can make them work for any season, icy or sunny. Plus, it’s a trend I don’t see fading anytime soon, so you can keep evolving it through winter, spring and summer. Click the notes for winter pastel color tips. –– Kelly Rowe

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Image 10-19-14 at 10.29 AM

The difference between butterscotch and caramel is a difference in complexity. Caramel is made from white (refined) sugar while butterscotch is made from brown (less refined) sugar that had molasses in it. The flavors in butterscotch are more complex: sweet, bitter, nutty, buttery. All that complexity comes through in this color which blends copper, gold, brown, and a touch of silver for a sweet shade you’ll want to sink your teeth into. Click the style notes for formulas and tips on application. –– Laura Martin

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