Currently viewing the tag: "gold"

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(glamour.com)

Most blondes have two, seemingly irreconcilable, goals: brightness and dimension. A blonde that achieves both is worth celebrating, like the icy shade recently adopted by Rachel McAdams. Her shade achieves it all by using a full spectrum of tones while staying within the same color level. In hair terms, this means alternating sections of cool platinum with beige, gold, and violet gray, all at a level 9 or 10. If done well the result is faceted like a crystal, expressing an overall cool tone flecked with reflective accents of other hues. Learn more about creating this crystalline effect in the style notes. –– Laura Martin  Click for StyleNotes →

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(Peter Nguyen, hairbrained.me)

When it comes to hair color and coffee, people often assume that darker is better. Who wants a weak brew or a diluted hue? But darker doesn’t necessarily mean better tasting or more beautiful. Dark roasted coffee beans can be overly bitter and super rich hair color can be harsh and stark looking. A light touch can actually lead to greater complexity. Light roast beans have a bright, fruity taste and lighter brown colors are shinier and reveal tertiary and quaternary tones. The shade pictured here has violet, gold, and silver undertones for a cool, pearlescent finish. Get the formula and application tips in the notes. –– Laura Martin Click for StyleNotes →

Liquid Gold

For most blondes, gold is a dirty word associated with cheap, fried strands. But gold doesn’t have to mean glaring yellow. This gorgeous metallic peachy hue has all the glamour and glister of a precious metal. It’s dimensional, glossy, and sunny. Click the style notes for application tips and the professional formulation. –– Laura Martin

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The difference between butterscotch and caramel is a difference in complexity. Caramel is made from white (refined) sugar while butterscotch is made from brown (less refined) sugar that had molasses in it. The flavors in butterscotch are more complex: sweet, bitter, nutty, buttery. All that complexity comes through in this color which blends copper, gold, brown, and a touch of silver for a sweet shade you’ll want to sink your teeth into. Click the style notes for formulas and tips on application. –– Laura Martin

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