Currently viewing the tag: "new haircut"

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Photo: Pinterest user Jazzy P.

Have you ever gotten a fantastic haircut, one you were so pleased with that at your next appointment you ask your stylist to do exactly the same thing, only to end up with a cut that while similar is definitely not the same? If you’ve experienced this—and most of us have—you may think your stylist has made a mistake or forgotten what he/she did previously, but the truth is more complicated. A haircut has a geometric foundation, but it also relies on creative detailing, growth patterns, and styling. Click the notes to learn more about the factors that create deviations in your haircut and why they shouldn’t make you lose faith in your stylist. –– Laura Martin  Click for StyleNotes →

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Photo: haircutweb.com

A fresh haircut is exciting, but it can also be a little awkward. The first few days of a new cut, it never looks quite right. Have you ever wondered why? Is it simply because you’re getting used to seeing something different or is it really true that a haircut settles over time, that it actually looks better once it’s been lived in? The truth is its a bit of both. Click the notes for details. Laura Martin  Click for StyleNotes →

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A bad haircut –– we have all gotten one. Maybe you left the salon crying, maybe you couldn’t look in the mirror, maybe you swore never to go out again. A bad haircut can be traumatizing. So click the notes for the 5 tips to rescue your life the day after you get a bad haircut. —Kelly Rowe

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Aziza CuttingGetting a great haircut can change everything for you. Without cutting a lot of length, you can reshape the style so it lays nicer, styles easier, and looks better. A great hair cut takes a minimal amount of time to blowdry because it easily falls into the shape it was cut in to. While haircuts can be scary for a lot of us, simple cutting techniques can result in the hair actually appearing longer, all from a few layers and cutting frizzy translucent ends off. Click the notes to see a razor long layer in action and the before and after. –– Kelly Rowe

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